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October 2012 Issue

 

  Research Digest
  October 2012
From the Division of Public Health SciencesDepartment of Surgery
Graham A. Colditz, MD, DrPH, Chief
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Dosing exercise: Minimal contact interventions significantly increase physical activity in those at high risk for colon cancer
 WolinK 
| Cancer Prevention Research |
Kathleen Wolin, ScD
Published in PLOS ONE
PubMed | Wolin Profile
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Local public health response to obesity epidemic may be lacking in areas at highest risk
StamatakisK 2
| Health Services Research |
Katherine Stamatakis, PhD, MPH
Published in Journal of Public Health Practice and Management
PubMed | Stamatakis Profile
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Overweight men with an aggressive type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma may have a better survival rate
Carson
| Clinical Outcomes Research |
Kenneth Carson, MD
Published in Journal of Clinical Oncology
PubMed | Carson Profile
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Read more of our publications online
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ABOUT US
This newsletter provides a select summary of research news from the Division of Public Health Sciences. 

We are a team of researchers and clinicians dedicated to preventing disease, improving health outcomes, and promoting quality and access to health care.

The Division of Public Health Sciences is part of the Department of Surgery.

CONTACT US
ostendorfa@wustl.edu
314.454.7650
Our Website

Division News Briefs

  • Mary Politi, PhDwas elected to the board of the Society for Medical Decision Making and will serve a three-year term from 2012 to 2015. This position extends from her work with the society since 2009 on the education committee, membership committee, as career development chair, and scientific review chair of SMDM's annual meetings.
  • Kim Kaphingst, ScD, and Washington University in St. Louis co-investigators Jen Ivanovich, MS, MBA, Melody Goodman, PhD, and Rebecca Dresser, JD, received a grant from the National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes for Health (R01 CA168608) to study communication preferences for whole genome sequencing results and the factors affecting these preferences among women who were diagnosed with breast cancer at age forty or younger.
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