History of Siteman’s Bone Marrow Transplant Program

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1980
  Geoffrey Herzig, MD, named first director of Washington University’s bone marrow transplant program.
       
1982
  Program’s first recorded bone marrow transplant is performed with marrow from a matched sibling pair.
       
1983
  First autologous transplant performed.
       
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1992
  First matched unrelated donor transplant performed.
       
1994
  John DiPersio, MD, PhD, named program director.
      First annual celebration for bone marrow and stem cell transplant patients.
       
1997
  Program members develop a mouse model of acute promyelocytic leukemia that will be used more than 10 years later in the first successful attempt to sequence the genome of a mouse with cancer.
       
1998
  New 26-bed transplant unit with ICU capabilities opens on north campus of Barnes-Jewish Hospital.
       
2003
  New laboratory space completed for Siteman's Hematopoietic Development and Malignancy Research ProgramEmbryonic Stem Cell CoreHigh-Speed Cell Sorter Core and Good Manufacturing Practice facility.
       
    Timothy Ley, MD, and colleagues awarded an $11 million Program Project grant from the National Cancer Institute to study the genetic basis of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML).
       
2004
  Washington University physicians complete program’s 3,000th transplant.
       
2005
  Opening of second unit for transplant and hematologic cancer patients, currently licensed for 38 beds.
       
2006
  Former Washington University resident and fellow Peter Westervelt, MD, PhD, named bone marrow and transplant program director.
       
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2007
  Washington University joins Multiple Myeloma Research Consortium, an organization of leading academic medical centers designed to speed the development of new myeloma therapies. (More
       
    AML Program Project grant renewed for five years.
       
2008
  Washington University scientists become first to sequence the genome of a cancer patient, a woman with AML. (More)
       
2009
  Genome of second AML patient sequenced, giving scientists a clearer picture of the complexity of the disease and allowing them to see unexpected genetic relationships among patients. (More)
       
2010
  Researchers discover mutations in a single gene – DNMT3A – predict poor outcomes in AML patients. (More)
       
2011
  First sequencing of a mouse cancer genome, using mouse model of acute promyelocytic leukemia developed at Washington University. (More)
       
      5,000th  transplant performed.