Siteman Director Elected President of Prestigious Surgical Association

Contact:
Jim Goodwin
314-286-0166
jgoodwin@wustl.edu

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Timothy Eberlein, MD, director of the Siteman Cancer Center

April 17, 2013 – Timothy Eberlein, MD, director of the Siteman
Cancer Center and chairman of the Department of Surgery at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, has been elected president of the Southern Surgical Association.

One of the nation’s leading medical groups, the association is dedicated to furthering the study and practice of surgery, especially
in the Southern states.

“I am honored to be a part of such a prestigious medical group and to work with my fellow board members to advance the practice of surgery,” Eberlein says.

He is the only Southern Surgical Association officer in Missouri.

“The association is honored and fortunate to have such an accomplished leader as Dr. Eberlein as its president this year,” says James O’Neill Jr., MD, chairman of the council of the Southern Surgical Association. “We look forward to working with him for an additional five years when he joins the council at the end of his presidency.”

Eberlein also serves as Bixby Professor of Surgery and Spencer T. and Ann W. Olin Distinguished Professor at Washington University School of Medicine and surgeon in chief at Barnes-Jewish Hospital.

Born in New Kensington, Pa., Eberlein earned undergraduate and medical degrees from the University of Pittsburgh. He was trained in surgery in Boston at Brigham and Women's Hospital at Harvard Medical School and later completed research and clinical fellowships at the National Cancer Institute.

Before joining Washington University in 1998, Eberlein served as the Richard E. Wilson Professor of Surgery at Harvard Medical School, chief of the Division of Surgical Oncology and vice chairman for research in the Department of Surgery at Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

A member of Phi Beta Kappa and Alpha Omega Alpha, Eberlein is the recipient of numerous honors and awards, including the Hench Award from the University of Pittsburgh and the Sheen Award from the American College of Surgeons. In 2004, he was elected to the National Academy of Sciences’ Institute of Medicine, one of the highest honors medical scientists in the United States can receive.